induction, deduction

The common methods of thinking are deduction and induction. The former method tries to establish a specific and limited conclusion by showing that it is allied with, or conforms to, a general truth or principle. In deduction, thought moves from the general to the particular: "From the general principle (fact) that most Scandinavians have blue eyes, the deduction may be made that Lars, a Scandinavian, probably has blue eyes." Induction seeks to establish a general truth, a principle. In induction, one observes a number of facts, classifies them, and arrives at a conclusion, or principle: "From observation of hundreds of Scandinavians, most of whom have blue eyes, one may induce (make an induction) that most Danes have blue eyes," Through induction, the laws (principles) of science have been arrived at. Through deduction, these principles (laws) are applied in specific situations, such as the development of a vaccine or the manufacture of a synthetic fiber.

Dictionary of problem words and expressions. . 1975.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Induction — In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction coil — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction pipe — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction port — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Induction valve — Induction In*duc tion, n. [L. inductio: cf. F. induction. See {Induct}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act or process of inducting or bringing in; introduction; entrance; beginning; commencement. [1913 Webster] I know not you; nor am I well pleased to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • deduction — deduction, induction Deduction is the inferring of particular instances from known or observed evidence; induction is the inferring of a general rule from particular instances …   Modern English usage

  • induction — deduction, induction Deduction is the inferring of particular instances from known or observed evidence; induction is the inferring of a general rule from particular instances …   Modern English usage

  • induction — *deduction Analogous words: *inference, ratiocination …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • deduction — See induction. See induction, deduction …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • induction — See induction, deduction …   Dictionary of problem words and expressions

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